Five Questions to Ask Your Oral Surgeon

The prospect of surgery is scary, no matter the reason for the procedure. Thankfully, patients can calm their fears, at least mostly, by meeting with their oral surgeon before their scheduled procedure. This consultation visit is the ideal opportunity for patients to ask questions they might have of the surgeon and ease their mind over the upcoming procedure. It’s important to have questions ready, before stepping into a consultation, so the appointment is as useful and educational as possible.

Five Questions to Ask Your Oral Surgeon During a Consultation Visit

1.) Why is This Surgery Necessary?

The most important question you need answered is the “why” for your surgery. Your oral surgeon wants you to understand your need for surgery. They never want you to go into a procedure feeling it’s unnecessary. You should walk away from your consultation understanding fully why this particular surgery is your best option to remedy the problem with which you are dealing.

2.) What is the Sequence of My Procedure?

You want to know what the surgeon plans on doing during your surgery. Ask. Let them go through step-by-step and tell you what to expect with each phase of the surgery, beginning with anesthesia. This question is important, because it gives you an accurate view of your procedure, so you know what to expect on the day of surgery.

3.) How Long will My Procedure Last?

Of course, not every patient is the same and complications can arise that prolong a surgery. However, a specialist in oral surgery, such as your oral surgeon, can give you an accurate estimation on surgery length. Keep in mind, your surgeon cannot foresee every unknown factor, so allow for some extra time when scheduling other tasks immediately after your surgery.

4.) What Will My Recovery Look Like?

Again, every patient is different. Therefore, your recovery process will not be exactly like anyone else’s. However, your oral surgeon should be able to tell you the time frame for typical recovery and what that looks like in most patients. For example, they can tell you, most patients return to work a week after this procedure. You might not need that long, but you might need longer. In addition, your surgeon should tell you how long you can expect pain, if at all. The idea is to give you a good idea of what recovery usually looks like in most patients.

5.) What Are The Risks of This Surgery?

Last but not least, you want to ask about the risks. Every surgery, no matter how common, comes along with a bit of risk. This can be scary, hearing what “could” happen. However, going over these “what ifs” can actually make you feel better about the procedure because you will learn what the worst possible outcome could be, while your surgeon explains why that won’t be the case in your situation. We recommend a consultation between you, the patient, and your surgeon before any wisdom teeth, implants, bone graph, or other oral surgery. The five questions listed above are a great way to get communication started and ensure you know exactly what to expect on the day of your oral surgery.

Helping Your Child Prepare for Oral Surgery

Oral surgery, as with any medical procedure, can be a frightening experience for anyone. For a child, it can be even more so because they are likely to have encountered fewer procedures in their young lives, and the fear of the unknown can be nerve-wracking and lead to anxiety. The good news is, you can help better prepare your child for the procedure and recovery and put their mind at ease, so they go into the process with no fear and fewer anxieties.

Discuss With Them the Benefits of the Procedure

As a child, they may not fully understand the reasoning behind their dental procedure. Discuss with them why they need to have the procedure. Will it help them to avoid future pain? Will it prevent them from having to have other corrective procedures in the future? Will it help them to speak or eat more easily once it is done? By understanding the positive outcomes of the procedure, they will better understand the need for it and can look forward to future benefits.

Fully Explain the Procedure to Them in a Calm Manner

Even if your child is young, they will want to understand what is going to happen during their procedure. When they don’t know what a procedure entails, they will tend to expect the worse, feeding into their fears. The important thing when explaining the procedure is to stay calm. A child reads their parent’s emotions and can definitely sense when you are afraid or nervous, so be sure to get yourself in a calm and relaxed place before discussing the procedure with them, even if you are worried.

You will need to tailor the discussion to their age, making sure it is at their level of comprehension so that they can understand. You don’t need to get too graphic or too detailed, but make sure that you walk them through the process, including how they will be prepped for the procedure and what will happen when they get to recovery.

Help Them to Keep Their Strength Up

Your child’s recovery will go the smoothest if they are as healthy and strong as possible. Reduce their chances of getting sick by keeping them on a healthy diet and sleep schedule. If they develop a cold or other health issues before the procedure, be sure to inform your oral surgeon and determine if there is anything you need to do beforehand. Be sure to follow all of the required pre-op procedures, such as not eating or drinking before the surgery so that they will be able to handle the anesthetic without complications.

Be Prepared for Recovery

Have everything you will need for the recovery process, such as soft or cold foods, making sure to find items that they are fond of. It is ok to spoil a child after their procedure and make their recovery as comfortable as possible.

It is also a good idea to take care of yourself before your child’s procedure so that you can remain calm and be the strong support they need through the process from preparation to recovery.

Before and After: Mandibular Osteotomy

Lower jaw (mandibular osteotomy). The lower jaw is divided and the front section is moved forward or backward and secured with plates and screws.

Lower jaw surgery, a mandibular osteotomy, can correct:

  • Receding lower jaw
  • Protruding lower jaw

The surgeon makes cuts behind the molars and lengthwise down the jawbone so the front of the jaw can move as one unit. The jaw can then be moved to its new position either forward or backward. Plates and screws hold the jawbone together as it heals.

Pre-Op

Post-Op

Before and After: Maxillary & Mandibular Osteotomy 3

Upper jaw (maxillary osteotomy) & Lower jaw (mandibular osteotomy)

Orthognathic surgery moves your teeth and jaws into positions that are more balanced, functional and healthy. Although the goal of orthognathic surgery is to improve your bite and function, many patients also experience enhancements to their appearance, breathing and speech.  Orthognathic surgery can have a dramatic and positive effect on many aspects of your life, and it’s likely that your self-esteem and confidence will be significantly boosted.

Pre-Op

Maxillary & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary & mandibular osteotomy

Post-Op

Maxillary & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary & mandibular osteotomy

Before and After: Maxillary & Mandibular Osteotomy & Genioplasty

Upper jaw (maxillary osteotomy) & Lower jaw (mandibular osteotomy) & Chin surgery (genioplasty)

Chin surgery (genioplasty). A genioplasty can correct a small chin (deficient chin). A small chin often accompanies a severely receded lower jaw.

Typically, surgeons can alter the jaw and restructure the chin during the same surgery. The surgeon cuts a piece of the chin bone on the front of the jaw, moves it forward, and secures it in a new position with plates and screws.

Pre-Op

Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & genioplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & genioplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & genioplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & genioplasty
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Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & genioplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & genioplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & genioplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & genioplasty

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Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & genioplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & genioplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & genioplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & genioplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & genioplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & genioplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & genioplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & genioplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & genioplasty

Before and After: Maxillary and Mandibular Osteotomy 2

Upper jaw (maxillary osteotomy) & Lower jaw (mandibular osteotomy)

Benefits of jaw surgery may include the relief of facial pain, headaches, snoring and obstructive sleep disorders, including sleep apnea. While a patient’s appearance may be dramatically enhanced as a result of orthognathic surgery, corrective jaw surgery is performed primarily to correct functional problems.

Pre-Op

Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy

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Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy

Before and After: Maxillary and Mandibular Osteotomy

Upper jaw (maxillary osteotomy) & Lower jaw (mandibular osteotomy)

Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct a wide range of skeletal and dental anomalies, including the misalignment of the jaws and teeth.

In normal jaw alignment, the upper jaw and teeth project slightly further than the lower teeth. Problems arise when the jaws or teeth don’t fit together properly because of the size and alignment of the jaw, or position of the teeth.

Pre-Op

Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
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Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy

Before and After: Osteotomy and Rhinoplasty

Upper jaw (maxillary osteotomy) & Lower jaw (mandibular osteotomy) & Rhinoplasty

Jaw surgery, also known as orthognathic (or-thog-NATH-ik) surgery, corrects irregularities of the jaw bones and realigns the jaws and teeth to improve the way they work. Making these corrections may also improve your facial appearance.

Rhinoplasty is a surgery to change the shape of the nose. Because both breathing and the nose’s shape are interrelated, a rhinoplasty may sometimes be performed not only to change the way the nose looks but also to improve breathing through the nose.

Pre-Op Gallery

Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & rhinoplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & rhinoplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & rhinoplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & rhinoplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & rhinoplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & rhinoplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & rhinoplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & rhinoplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & rhinoplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & rhinoplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & rhinoplasty

Post-Op Gallery

Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & rhinoplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & rhinoplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & rhinoplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & rhinoplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & rhinoplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & rhinoplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & rhinoplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & rhinoplasty
Maxillary osteotomy & mandibular osteotomy & rhinoplasty

Bone Grafting Treatments to End Your Year with a Smile

As the holiday feasts and festivities begin to show themselves this season, it is important to make sure your oral health is in great care, and you have a complete smile to enjoy all of the delectable delights that the snow-filled season has to offer. If you have any lost or missing teeth, it is important to make sure they are replaced with effective prosthetics that are durable and strong. If you are in need of a dental implant, but your jaw is not strong enough to hold them, and oral surgery using a bone graft will be necessary.

Bone grafting is extremely popular for dental implants because it allows your jaw to be strengthened to the point it can adequately hold a dental implant in place. According to the American Association of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeons, if your jawbone is too soft, too fragile, or too thin, a bone graft is recommended prior to dental implant placements.

A bone graft works by taking part of a bone from one section of your body and grafting it onto your jawbone. Artificial prosthetic bone grafting materials can also be used. Not only will bone grafts strengthen your jaw bone, but they will also improve your oral health. Although a bone graft often takes several months before it can strengthen to the point your jaw is strong enough to hold an implant, it is well worth it to give you the satisfaction and joy you require heading into next year.

If you are in need of a bone grafting treatment or would like to come in for an examination to determine your candidacy for the service. Contact Aspire Surgical at our office in Salt Lake. With the help of our docotors and our team, a bone grafting treatment can be used to help progress your mouth towards a full smile. Have a ‘spooktacular’ Halloween and a happy holiday season!